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But What About FDA Regulations?

The author writes that when you are auditing, you should always read the FDA regulations again to ensure accuracy.  

I hear this question, or a question with similar wording, quite frequently when I am auditing. Typically, the question is in response to a better way to do something that seems simple and efficient. Most people seem to approach regulatory requirements with the approach of…let’s bury the regulator in paperwork. While it’s true that auditors expect a certain amount of paperwork with each regulatory requirement, they frequently accept a broader range of documentation than people realize (i.e., one page can be enough).

For example, a design control procedure could be a one-page flowchart that references forms and work instructions, or twelve separate documents, with a minimum length of ten pages and a maximum of forty pages per document. As long as the procedure has sufficient detail for personnel performing these tasks, and all the required elements are included, ISO clauses 7.3.1-7.3.7. An auditor should identify the process as conforming.

However, some people are FDA inspectors looking for NONCONFORMITY!

In the case of inspectors, it is critical to present your information in such a way that it is easy for the inspector to see how you meet the requirements of the regulations. One of the best ways to do that is to reference the requirements directly in your procedures.

For those that prefer finesse try to organize information following the regulations. For example, if I am writing a procedure for an ISO registration audit, I write the procedure to specifically address the ISO sub-clauses. I might even use a document control number like SOP-73 for my “Design and Development” procedure.

In my previous blog posting, http://bit.ly/AuditHours, I suggested a slight change to the scheduling of internal audits. To ensure this meets FDA requirements, the key is to READ THE REGULATIONS AGAIN. Concerning internal auditing, the applicable FDA regulation is 21 CFR 820.22:

“Each manufacturer shall establish procedures for quality audits and conduct such audits to assure that the quality system is in compliance with the established quality system requirements and to determine the effectiveness of the quality system. Quality audits shall be conducted by individuals who do not have direct responsibility for the matters being audited. Corrective action (s), including a reaudit of deficient matters, shall be taken when necessary. A report of the results of each quality audit, and reaudit(s) where taken, shall be made and such reports shall be reviewed by management having responsibility for the matters audited. The dates and results of quality audits and reaudits shall be documented.”

The above requirement is quite vague concerning how many auditors and how many days must be spent auditing. These are the variables I suggested changing in my previous blog http://bit.ly/AuditHours. The FDA regulation 21 CFR 820.22 is specific, however, with regard to documenting the “reaudit” of any deficiencies found during an audit. This prescriptive requirement can be met by reviewing previous audit findings of all audits with the audit program manager during the audit preparation process. The audit program manager can facilitate the assignment of which auditor will reaudit each discovery. This may require a few more minutes of audit preparation, but this should not measurably impact the overall time allocated to an audit.

I do this out of habit when I am performing internal audits on behalf of clients, but if I am auditing the internal audit process of a client—now I’ll remember to point out this additional requirement that is specific to the FDA and not included in the ISO Standard. This is why we should always READ THE REGULATIONS AGAIN.

 

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